Village Song by Sarojini Naidu Summary and Stanza-wise meaning

The Village Song by Sarojini Naidu is one of the great pieces of Indian poetry showing the Indian motherhood and an approach by an Indian girl to her married life. The entire poem talks the dialogues between an Indian other and daughter regarding her marriage.

Sarojini Naidu has written two poems on the same tittle ‘Village Song’. Here we are analyzing the Stanza-wise meaning of Village Songs starts with the line “Honey, child, honey, child,..”.

Also Read: Poem Village Song “Full are my pitchers and far to carry…”

Stanza-wise Summary of Village Song

Stanza 1

HONEY, child,…………………… whither are you going? 
………………………………………………….. breezes blowing? 
Would you………………………………. golden grain…………? 
……………………………………………………………………….. you?

The poem opens with a scene of rural household, where the mother is pleading her daughter not to run off. It’s an occasion of her marriage, the bride is bedecked with beautiful attire and ornaments. Though she is bedecked beautifully, she is not happy. Don’t know why, may be she is tender aged, or she is showing childlike behavior she doesn’t want to get married. Seems she is bonded strongly with nature and feels unwilling to be shifted into a marital bond.

The first stanza is filled with full of questions from the mother to her daughter (bride). With distracted mind, mother calls her ‘HONEY, child…’ and asks where she is going?

Would you cast your jewels all to the breezes blowing?” –  this line is heart touching to the readers, she asks will she cast all the nicely bedecked ornaments away and abort the marriage?

And she asks again will she leave her lovely mother who grew up her to this age by providing all her needs even in difficulty.

Mother again asks her daughter if she is determined to make her groom cry.

This stanza is an open heart of Indian motherhood. The girl is very young thus she can’t accept a married life for the time being. She can’t even think of that, seems she is standing for the mother’s will. But her mind is still kiddy, she prefers to stay unmarried. To her age, her present free life is far more enjoyable than a dull married life.

Stanza 2

Mother mine,…………………………………… 
……………………………………………………..buds are blowing; 
To the köil-haunted river-isles…………………………………. 
…………………….. fairy folk…………………………me: O listen!

The girl replies, she is going to forest where Champa trees are laden with champa buds and beautiful flowers. The river flowing by the forest has many tiny islands that are home for Koil (Asian koel-a bird). The shining lotus and lilies add more charm to the forest. She tells the the fairy folk are calling her.

The girl is fascinated by the charm nature. In her perception the married life is mundane. Thus she prefers pleasure from the nature than a dull married life.

Stanza 3

Honey……………………………………………………………………………..
……………………………..cradle-songs and sandal-scented leisure. 
………………………………..in the loom, ……………………………………….., 
…………………..on the hearth: O whither are you going?

Mother again tries to catch the daughter’s attention. She reminds her about the many pleasures of the world and wedded life. Bridal songs are beautiful. Motherhood and cradle songs will give much pleasure and fulfill the life. Mother also reminds her of the pleasure of marital leisure.

Mother then brings her attention toward her attire. Her bridal robes are made using loom in glowing saffron and silver color combination. Her bridal cakes and dishes are getting ready. Her mother reminds her all of these to console her and tries to stay back in the wedding happiness.

Stanza 4

…………………………cradle-songs have cadences of sorrow, 
The laughter of the sun to-day, the wind of death to-morrow. 
………………………………………………………………………………………….. 
O mother……………………………………………………………..calling.

The bride’s sorrow fades the happiness of the wedding celebration. As a philosopher the girl says “The laughter of the sun to-day, the wind of death to-morrowthe happiness of life is not permanent, they will come and fade. Today’s happiness may be tomorrow’s sorrow.

She still finds the sounds of forest with streams and tiny islands is more happier place. The charm of the streams, forest, the songs of the Koil are endless source of pleasure, they never fade away. She says “O mother mine, I cannot stay, the fairy-folk are calling

The poem ends with the strong determination of the girl to leave the home and spend the life in the lap of the nature, which can give ultimate pleasure to her.

Salahudheen Kozhikoden

The Founder and CEO of LittleHelpz. He is a post-graduate in English Language and Literature and a web addict. His areas of interest are Blogging, Designing, Programming